Art of the Cut: Conversations with Film and TV Editors by Steve Hullfish

By Steve Hullfish

Art of the Cut presents an unparalleled examine the artwork and means of modern movie and tv enhancing. it's a attention-grabbing "virtual roundtable dialogue" with greater than 50 of the head editors from around the world. integrated within the dialogue are the winners of greater than a dozen Oscars for top enhancing and the nominees of greater than 40, plus a number of Emmy winners and nominees. jointly they've got over 1000 years of modifying event and feature edited greater than 1000 videos and television exhibits.



Hullfish conscientiously curated over 100 hours of interviews, organizing them into subject matters serious to editors in all places, producing a longer dialog between colleagues. The discussions supply a extensive spectrum of reviews that illustrate either similarities and adjustments in concepts and creative ways. themes comprise rhythm, pacing, constitution, storytelling and collaboration.



Interviewees contain Margaret Sixel (Mad Max: Fury Road), Tom go (Whiplash, l. a. los angeles Land), Pietro Scalia (The Martian, JFK), Stephen Mirrione (The Revenant), Ann Coates (Lawrence of Arabia, homicide at the Orient Express), Joe Walker (12 Years a Slave, Sicario), Kelley Dixon (Breaking Bad, The strolling Dead), and lots of more.



Art of the Cut additionally contains in-line definitions of modifying terminology, with an entire word list and 5 supplemental internet chapters hosted on-line at www.routledge.com/cw/Hullfish. This publication is a treasure trove of worthy tradecraft for aspiring editors and a prized source for high-level operating pros. The book’s available language and nice behind-the-scenes perception makes it a desirable glimpse into the artwork of filmmaking for all fanatics of cinema.



 

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